Essential supplies for new teachers

Essential supplies for new teachers

Schools have stacks of supplies but they can slip through your fingers and sometimes it's easier to get your own survival pack together.

Certain types of school equipment run out faster than others, depending on the age groups you’re teaching. Teachers can often end up wasting time waiting in lines to use particularly popular equipment which means lost opportunities for other tasks such as marking, safeguarding, training, or assessments. There’s always a dedicated stock cupboard, usually categories by subject then organised into type of equipment. No doubt, this is locked and the official office staff hold the key. These gate keepers often barricade access to ensure stock levels remain ample. 

If teaching is the long-term career path you want to take, why not consider investing in the key supplies that make the teacher life easier to manage? It can save time, stress and make work life smoother. As long as you keep your mouth buttoned and don’t tell all your colleagues about the snazzy new stuff you’ve got. Otherwise, everybody will want to use it! Making your own resources can be time consuming -at first- but they can then be reused, especially if digitised or laminated, year after year. Store them on a pen drive and keep them in a safe place to create a database of teaching resources.

Always include teaching resources and supplies that incite passion and inspire students to engage with the subject. If you’re an English teacher, there should be a collection of books aimed at the ages you teach to encourage active readers. If you teach geography, there should be text books, podcasts, films and equipment such as globes, maps and cultural artefacts. It’s proactive to embrace technology for students of all ages. Relating to the things they know best in the modes they’re used to receiving information will stimulate their learning and show you have a vested interest in their development. 

Household objects
You would be surprised how simple items such as a toothbrush or keyring can be useful in class, particularly English.

Range of books
Both fiction and non fiction relating to the subject matter will help students become captivated by the topic. 

Spare stationary
What student would be complete without forgetting their pen or ruler? The rite of passage continues. 

Academic diary
Teachers cannot fit everything inside their heads, as hard as they may try to. A personal planner is essential to the job.

Water container
Teaching, talking and walking a lot is thirsty work. Always take a water bottle and a flask to stay hydrated.

Primary

Secondary

For younger pupils, age must be accounted for when assessing and choosing materials to support lesson plans. All resources and equipment must be safe and age-appropriate. 

Older pupils expect respect and to be treated like adults. This should be reflected in the supplies utilised to support their learning to demonstrate a level of trust and understanding.

  • Stickers
  • Story telling props 
  • SEN resources e.g. fidget pencils, learning aids (counters, picture cards, timers etc.)
  • Prize box (bouncy balls, bendy pencils, stickers, mini-games)
  • Reward charts
  • Talking stick
  • Stress balls
  • Adult scissors
  • Visual timetables
  • Arts/Crafts box (wool, glitter, sequins, beads, ribbon, chalk)
  • Classroom mascot
  • Visual rules poster
  • Red pens
  • Technology
  • Blank award certificates
  • Laminator
  • Paper trimmer
  • Hand sanitiser

  • Paper trimmer
  • Laminator
  • Paper in/out tray
  • Binder folder
  • Digital or hard copy diary planner
  • Adult scissors
  • Pencil pot/desk tidy
  • Stapler
  • Hole punch
  • Paper clips
  • Label maker
  • Red pens
  • Stickers (you’re never too old)
  • Visual rules poster
  • Technology
  • Blank award certificates
  • Prize box (stationary, key rings, fidget spinner, lip balm, deck of cards)
  • Hand sanitiser

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